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Unique electric sports car Black Mamba: a composite solution from Malta

Unique electric sports car Black Mamba: a composite solution from Malta

Malta-based Valene Motors unveiled a prototype of sports triple under a catchy name Black Mamba. The novelty car has a composite body that comprises basalt fiber materials.

This high-performance electric trike is sure not to have been designed for slow drivers since the vehicle will be able to go from zero to 100km/h in just 4,2 seconds. And they say the base 107-horsepower model can do it! But a maximum potential output of Black Mamba models reaches 810bhp.

The team used “composite materials with high elastic and memory properties” for the body of the vehicle that can “sustain low speed impacts without any significant damage” and reduce the risk of injury during high speed wrecks.

Valene Motors doesn’t reveal the composition of composite material but the company official explained to our website that they “have various materials”, the choice “will depend on configuration, but will be using Carbon Fibre and Basalt and others”.

The company went even further than a super powerful engine and a composite with elastic properties, the novelty is equipped with an on-board computer to monitor the traction of the rear tire in order to help drivers significantly increase the control and safety of the vehicle.

Because of its clever aerodynamic design, the Valene Black Mamba’s battery pack and motor are cooled without needing the use of fans. The car is smartphone activated with a three-tier user identification.

Valene Motors claims the Black Mamba is currently in the advanced prototype stage and deliveries could begin in 2017.

About Olga Yurchenko

Olga Yurchenko
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